Race and the Civil Rights Movement

Title

Race and the Civil Rights Movement

Files

Loading...

Media is loading
 

Identifier

JonesL_02_20140116-Final_Clip06

Publication Date

1-16-2014

Publisher

The Making Cancer History® Voices Oral History Collection, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center

City

Houston, Texas

Creative Commons License

Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 3.0 License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 3.0 License.

Transcript

Tacey Ann Rosolowski, PhD

Okay. So you’re eleven, riding with college kids.

Lovell Jones, PhD

Yeah. Oh, that was—it ruined me. (laughter)

Tacey Ann Rosolowski, PhD

I mean, how so ruined you? In a good way or a bad way?

Lovell Jones, PhD

Well, my mom kicked me out of the house when I was fifteen [unclear].

Tacey Ann Rosolowski, PhD

Oh, my goodness.

Lovell Jones, PhD

I think it was fifteen. No, it was a little less. No, let’s see. I was thirteen. Thirteen.

Tacey Ann Rosolowski, PhD

I mean, did it turn you into a radical? I mean, what happened?

Lovell Jones, PhD

Well, I got adopted by the college kids, and I participated in the civil rights stuff that they participated in because the bus would go and I would go. I was their mascot. (laughs)

Tacey Ann Rosolowski, PhD

So these were students who had been radicalized.

Lovell Jones, PhD

Mm-hmm, yeah.

Tacey Ann Rosolowski, PhD

And they were participating in civil rights. And the year would have been?

Lovell Jones, PhD

1960. (Rosolowski laughs.) So that was interesting.

Tacey Ann Rosolowski, PhD

What were some of the events you attended that you—

Lovell Jones, PhD

Marches downtown, sit-ins downtown. (laughs)

Tacey Ann Rosolowski, PhD

Did you ever get picked up by the police?

Lovell Jones, PhD

No, because they kind of protected me. They’d shove me away.

Tacey Ann Rosolowski, PhD

Now, did you understand what was going on at the time?

Lovell Jones, PhD

I would say probably not really. It’s like, “Hmm. I’m not going to make class now,” or, “I’m going to be late to get to class.” That’s the only thing. So it was interesting. I mean, they didn’t do it often and I didn’t go with them often, but it was enough for me to see some things.

Race and the Civil Rights Movement

Share

COinS