Robert S. Benjamin, MD, Oral History Interview, December 12, 2014

Title

Robert S. Benjamin, MD, Oral History Interview, December 12, 2014

Files

Download Full Interview Transcript (480 KB)

Description

Major Topics Covered:

  • Personal and educational background
  • History of research into the pharmacology of cancer drugs
  • Research: landmark work on the cardiac toxicity of Adriamycin; intra-arterial delivery of Cisplatin to treat osteosarcoma
  • Culture of Department of Developmental Therapeutics; Emil J Freireich, MD [Oral History Interview]

Identifier

BenjaminRS_01_20141212

Publication Date

12-12-2014

Publisher

The Historical Resources Center, Research Medical Library, The University of Texas Cancer Center

City

Houston, Texas

Creative Commons License

Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 3.0 License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 3.0 License.

Topics Covered

University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, UT MD Anderson Cancer Center, University of Texas System. M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, M.D. Anderson Hospital and Tumor Institute at Houston, University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, M.D. Anderson Hospital and Tumor Institute

Disciplines

History of Science, Technology, and Medicine | Oncology | Oral History

About the Interview

About the Interview Subject:

Robert S. Benjamin, MD (b. 20 April 1943, Brooklyn, New York came to MD Anderson in 1974 as a fellow in the Department of Developmental Therapeutics. He is now a Professor in the Department of Sarcoma Medical Oncology. He first focused his research in the entirely new area of the pharmacology of cancer drugs. After a few years at MD Anderson, however, Dr. Benjamin shifted his focus to sarcoma medical oncology, and conducted landmark studies establishing chemotherapy treatments for the disease, leading to limb salvage and multi-modality treatment approaches. Dr. Benjamin served as Chair of the Department of Melanoma/Sarcoma and then the Department of Sarcoma—from 1993 to 2012. He has been known within MD Anderson culture as “King Pin” because of many pins patients have given him to wear on his lab coat.

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Robert S. Benjamin, MD, Oral History Interview, December 12, 2014

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